CAD/CAM discussion forum > 3D CAD/CAM > Easy stuff is hard

Easy stuff is hard

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warren

Newbie

posts: 0

Registered: 2004-10-28

Message 1 of 6

 Easy stuff is hard
28-01-2005 07:08 . pm | View his/her posts only
IN MY HUMBLE OPINION...

First the good.

The support team has been great putting up with my problems. As soon as I send off an email to the support team they are on it, often within hours. Great work.

The hard and complex stuff, what I'm use to in my business, has been well thought out and is easy (intuitive) to learn. The parameterized freeform TWEAK commands are probably the most awesome tools I've ever used for my designs.

Now the bad.

The basics of creating simple geometry in sketches seem to have been glossed over in the ease of use and intuitiveness. Splines are very difficult to manipulate and I've found often unpredictable.

Maybe it can be turned off BUT I find the cursor bouncing around to the active box aggrivating. While I see the logic of this it is unfamiliar with any other Windows behavior that we have all been trained to accept.

It's not on LINUX or MAC.



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ChrisWard2k2

Newbie

posts: 2

Registered: 2011-11-22

Message 2 of 6

29-01-2005 06:03 . am | View his/her posts only
Hi again cncsurf

Well, actually, cursor focus to the current field of the current form is standard Windows behaviour.............

However, you are right, there are plenty of times when your focus is on the geometry and you don't want the cursor to leap over to the form. You can "roll-up" the form by clicking on it's tiny double chevron icon in the lower left corner, or change the default configuration to not show the options form (Utilities,Configuration,General tab, untick "Show option form"). In this mode, you can use the options form by simply clicking on the options button to reveal it. Also in Config, under the 2D tab, you can if you wish un-tick "Auto prompt dimension value" which suppresses the little dimension value input form. If you find that the cursor seems to pick-up geometry a distance away from where you are pointing (this is affected by your screen resolution), go to the Display tab of the config form and change the "pick aperture size". Finally, when selecting/manipulating geometry, don't forget that there is a context sensitive menu just a right-mouse click away.

The VX Sketcher does behave somewhat differently than many others you will see because it is not simply a bolt-on of a 3rd party technology. However, you will soon get the hang of it! The VX Sketcher is very powerful and has some unique tools that our competitors would love to copy if they could It can handle very complex geometry (even multiple shapes) and is very flexible in use with the modeller - for example, you don't have to select the entire Sketch for a model command, you can select (filter down to) individual curves in a Sketch (or Sketches) if you require. Have you visited the free downloads web page? There you will find a tool called ReadySketch. It offers a number of pre-defined Sketch shapes, is easy to use and a genuine time saver.

FREE DOWNLOADS

Rank: 1

Kevin

Newbie

posts: 0

Registered: 2004-4-26

Message 3 of 6

31-01-2005 04:56 . am | View his/her posts only
After nearly a year of VX use I still do find the sketcher tricky to use. But to be fair thats probably because I was so used to the ones in SolidWorks and ThinkDesign - both based on the D-Cubed engine - and the VX one is very different. What I've learned is to lock everything down with dimensions and edit the dimensions. Nothing else seems to work that well. Is this a drawback or an advantage? Depends on your point of view. Personally I think its both.

I do have other issues with the software - but this may well be down to inexperience (with VX). And that (to me) is the crux of the problem. Like cncsurf I have a lot of 3D experience in other apps, yet I feel like a fish out of water with VX sometimes. I'm not a full time CAD user. I spend maybe 40% of my time using CAD - maybe only 30% of that time using VX. I switch between apps, and whilst I find I can do this easily with other systems I struggle using VX. To me VX is a full time CAD user's system - am I wrong?



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warren

Newbie

posts: 0

Registered: 2004-10-28

Message 4 of 6

03-02-2005 01:17 . pm | View his/her posts only
I would think it's full time to unlearn the habits I'm in with other programs. I've only had VX for a few months. I've been designing with other programs that are basically the same. It's hard getting out of the habits I'm in from the mid level packages out there.

HOWEVER in my defense and VX, the CNC package (which I mostly got VX for since I'm mostly dealing with customer's files) fits in with what I'm use to. And the QuickMill tools are just awesome. An especially enthusiastic "atta boy" to the high speed toolpaths. The amount of time I've saved on just a couple of prototypes has me hooked to VX.

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Kevin

Newbie

posts: 0

Registered: 2004-4-26

Message 5 of 6

03-02-2005 01:55 . pm | View his/her posts only
Thats true. I'm not being totally fair on VX in that I've just not had the hours to devote to learning it thoroughly - unlike when I had to learn SolidWorks or the Ashlar software. As a result I tend to default back to their way of working and end up swearing :-) Thinking back (literally) it took me 12 months of using ThinkDesign until I really got into it....only to find out that it really didn't cut it.....by which time I had already renewed another years subs :-(

Rank: 1

ChrisWard2k2

Newbie

posts: 2

Registered: 2011-11-22

Message 6 of 6

03-02-2005 05:11 . pm | View his/her posts only
Hi chaps


VX is more akin to the high-end stuff than it is to the mid-range modellers. With more capability and greater depth of functionality, it can take a while to get to grips with some of the finer points. A lot of this is to do with the fact that VX has methods/commands that you will not have used before, so naturally you try to complete a task in the way you are used to in another package - which of course you can with VX, but at sometime in the future, when the "penny drops", you will look back and realise that the work could have been done in a fraction of the time

See also