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warren

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posts: 12

Registered: 2012-2-9

Message 1 of 7

 ZW3D Power
22-12-2013 12:33 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
I just wanted to share with everyone the power I've found in ZW3D. (No, they don't pay me.) I design and manufacture classical guitars, electric guitars, and ukuleles and support several luthiers in the US. Attached are two pictures. One is a leading 3D CAD package that shows the hassle I go through for a simple blend on my electric guitars (just a sample) versus THE SINGLE CLICK result of ZW3D.

The competition takes a good hour to get 'sort of' right along with a dozen commands and sketches.

With ZW it is a single click on the fillet command. ZW definately has bragging rights for the power of their offset fillet command.


Mid range CAD

guitar body blend.jpg
2013-12-22 12:31

ZW single click blend

guitar body blend zw.jpg
2013-12-22 12:31

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William

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Registered: 2010-10-28

Message 2 of 7

25-12-2013 11:04 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Hi Warren, Good case, we did learn something!
I also made another guita model with ZW3D before, but I created the surface with Curve mesh command.

2013-12-25 11-00-15.jpg
2013-12-25 11:03



2013-12-25 11-00-56.jpg
2013-12-25 11:04

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Paul

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Registered: 2011-9-17

Message 3 of 7

28-12-2013 06:01 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Post Last Edit by mudcrab at 2013-12-28 06:03

Good post.
Here is another simple - short history - way of getting a blend curve with more control that you have with the offset fillet.
So base, set up trim curves using wireframe tools, then trim to curves then a loft.The power is in the loft and being able to regulate the tangent influence for each face. My favourite tool.

Showing Loft controls.
GL_GuitarBlend1.jpg
2013-12-28 05:59


Showing the short & easy history.
GL_GuitarBlend02.jpg
2013-12-28 05:59


I am sure there are many other solutions, but most importantly ZW3D allows for some easy and fast surface modelling.
Cheers Paul

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warren

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posts: 12

Registered: 2012-2-9

Message 4 of 7

01-01-2014 10:17 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Reply 3# mudcrab


I dare you to try that in a different mid level CAD package.

I'm really looking forward to Version 2014

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Paul

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posts: 330

Registered: 2011-9-17

Message 5 of 7

02-01-2014 05:16 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
OK, so fillets are boring as it looks like it was designed by a dude using popular solid modelling software. Look around and you will see a lot of fillet modelling. Sometimes it Works, but a lot of the time something much nicer could have been done.An artist would vary the curvature so it fitted the player and was a lot more appealing as an artwork. Beauty should be something all designers aspire to, regardless of the article.
e.g. Edit the edge offset curve to create the irregular outline, then do the same for the adjacent. (OK I cheated and did a single curve trim) Now we have something a lot nicer and the only additional effort is editing the trim curves.
Now complete the loft, add and modify some loft control lines as the edge lengths are quite different and you have something much curvier.
Cheers - Paul
GL_GuitarBlend03B.jpg
2014-1-2 17:14

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Mark

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posts: 89

Registered: 2011-7-11

Message 6 of 7

09-01-2014 08:51 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
Reply 5# mudcrab

Hello Paul, cam you show us how you modified the control points of the offset curve to get that nice shape?

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Paul

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posts: 330

Registered: 2011-9-17

Message 7 of 7

10-01-2014 02:42 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Post Last Edit by mudcrab at 2014-1-10 02:47

Hi Mark,
file attached.
There are numerous ways to create curves on a surface. I just used and edge offset, which is then a 3D Curve. You can edit the curve to create what you want. The trick is to make the tolerance for the point reduction quite high say 50, then reduce the number of points to something you can manage manually.
In reality, it would probably be easier to do a sketch which would give much more control and editing possibilities. If the surface is planar then the Trim with Curves In place option works, otherwise you need ot project he sketch to the surface.
The model explains it self.
LOFTs - read the help. It is worth learning to manage lofts.
This video is quite long but the lofting is demonstrated early on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXKZ_2rtEdY

Getting the profile connect pick points aligned is a good starting practice. e.g. both start arrows about the same place and pointing the same direction. Occasionally this is difficult and splitting an edge may be required to set this up nicely.
Once the loft is in place, Add Connection lines. Make sure your pick setting (RMB in modal space) on All and non critical. Then just click on an edge where the loft is most wonky or out of shape. Add 2 or three for a start. Then use the Modify to move one end or the other of the Control line to tell the loft how it is to align at that point.
You can also play with the tangency controls at each end or both ends simultaneously.
The other trick with lofts is that rather than lofting between solids, always remove the face that would be buried and loft between surface edges. this way you get full tangency control. You will use curve lists a lot to collect the set of edges you are lofting with.
Then there are the Bi rail and Drive Curve Lofts! If you an popular solids modeller user, you might find the loftin g in ZW works roughly 90deg different to what you are used to. e.g what you would thing of is a profile, should be a drive curve. Huh...!
Experiment lots.
Cheers Paul
GL_GuitarLofts.zip (192.26 KB)
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