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Who makes the biggest parts????

    
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OldForumPost

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Message 1 of 8

 Who makes the biggest parts????
18-01-2007 05:45 . am   |   View his/her posts only
I thought it would be fun to see who makes the largest VX parts.

Take a look at the attached, this particular customer designs Heavy Plant. He even models the site buildings and from surveyor points models, with point clouds the site ground. He does this so that the heavy machinery sits on the uneven ground correctly.
All the parts shown in the attached were modeled in VX. The conveyors are 24metres long and 6metres high. Typically the assemblies contain hundreds of parts.
This project was completed digitally in VX and manufactured and assemled on site without any modifications or changes, everything fitted perfectly, first time.

Well done to VX and Scott Engineering (West Sussex uk)

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ChrisWard2k2

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18-01-2007 08:15 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Hello Mike

That is a very good example of what VX can do in heavy industry. I think the bridge building company in Italy makes pretty big stuff too - the bridges are bigger than the plant, but who knows which incorporates the biggest part? There could be other contenders in the transport industry. Who has designed the smallest part with VX?

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Kevin

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18-01-2007 12:34 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
How about the most complex part? I remember seeing a Nissan dashboard moulding done in Varimatrix in the '90s. Any examples like that these days?

I see on the VX website there is a new merry-go-round type graphic showing what looks like a car door panel and a mirror that was "designed in 5 mins in VX". Be interested to see how these parts were made....

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ChrisWard2k2

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Message 4 of 8

18-01-2007 04:01 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
...The biggest prize would be for the "most useless part". I have seen some very funny (though expensive) design office mistakes in my time and it is just incredible how, even these days, Murphy's Law still comes into play and the darned thing gets manufactured. Years ago (years and years), the aircraft company that I was working for had what was affectionately known as the "Clanger Awards" - this is based on an English expression whereby your (big) mistake is described as having "dropped a clanger" (a clanger is that dangly bit inside a bell). So, anybody wish to jump up on the stage to claim this award?

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Kevin

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19-01-2007 02:29 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Chris, I've made a career based on clangers :-)

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Deri

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06-03-2007 04:09 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
http://www.marinedesign.co.uk/bluefinn40.html
OK- this is the biggest tub I've done the structure for in VX - 40' (13m) fast fishing boat, with some pretty complex structure to put up with pounding through waves and some nasty curved shapes to handle - some 180-200 odd components I think. CNC waterjet cut and worked first go, no probs.
I suppose the 65' tug scans are longer, but not so much work.
Cheers
Deri

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warren

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Message 7 of 8

26-03-2007 11:59 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
I would have to say my latest wax investment mold would be up the most complex project I have ever done in my self employed career. Not only was the imported geometry in need of days of rebuilding, but the mold itself had roughly 360 machined total blocks and pulls for the mold, gate molds, chills, and solubles. (36 radial pulls (one pull per 10 degrees) just on the part mold), 2 layers thick, inner cone cam locks, outer cone cam locks, with 3 configurations of the part. Then there were the molds for the chills, gates, and for the solubles (in 3 configurations). For a grand total of nearly 360 blocks. All blocks CNC cut on 3 axis FADAL except for manually lathe cut for the cone cam locks and machine blocked core pieces. It took me more time then I care to remember (months) and has definately been the single largest and most complex project I have ever worked on. Unfortunately you'll have to take my word for it. I'm constrained by a NDA so I can't even put pictures of the parts on my portfolio. VX handled it just fine on my big box computer. Though my laptop computer didn't always digest the massive assembly and I broke it down in to several sub assemblies and down to the single part file for CNC programming. I love mold making!!! I wish I could brag with pictures, dangit!!!

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ChrisWard2k2

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Message 8 of 8

28-03-2007 04:27 . am   |   View his/her posts only


In my experience, customers are prepared to drop the NDA once their product has had a long run on the market. So, you might have to wait two or three years, but eventually you could be adding an impressive project to your portfolio.

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