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New part creation in Assemblies?

    
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Paul

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Registered: 2011-7-12

Message 1 of 7

 New part creation in Assemblies?
04-02-2011 04:04 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
Today I was reviewing ZW2010 with a co-worker.

We tried the Assembly demo from ZW's Show and Tell.

This sparked some ideas in how this might be very helpful in the work that we do. Up to this point I have never even used the Assembly option in VX, yet we have several Assembly type applications.

I learned that a simple double click on an inserted part would allow a full edit of this part while in the Assembly view. This was quite awesome tied with the ability to do this while the imported parts are held in true assembled relationship with each other.

My co-worker brought up a very good question. Can a model be initiated in an Assembly without the need to import this model? In other words I would like to start and complete the entire project while using Assembly.

This is the way I'd like to see this:

-Build 1st model and once it is sufficiently completed right click on this model and change it's nature from a Solid to a Component. I know that this model would need to reside somewhere; and I believe that the easy place for this to transition to would be in another Object in the same part file.
-Build next model(s) in same way as 1st model was built. When each model is to the desired level of completion you would right click on this to change it into a Component.

It would be extremely helpful to create an entire Assembly project in one Assembly workspace without having an intermingling of histories from each seperate part of the Assembly. Even though each part would be generated in the same workspace all I would like to see in the history tree is an Insert Component for each model that was worked on.

Can something of this nature be carried out? If so could you point out the operations that would need to be done to accomplish this? The benefit of working on everything within the same model space is that all the proper clearances can be observed.

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Mike

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Message 2 of 7

05-02-2011 01:12 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
Paul,

This is a very good question and Yes, we can do this.

Open the top level assembly/part.
Insert component > give it a new name > locate it at (0,0,0) > start modeling.
Exit Part (you will be back in the assembly)

Insert component > give it a new name > locate it at (0,0,0) > start modeling.

The only difference you will notice with this model is that you can see the first component. You can drop reference curves, points, etc into the new model so the two parts will be linked.

Exit part
Insert Component

There is a training manual included in the software that has a small assembly example. See the HELP pulldown > Training Manual > Innovator. See the chapter that shows you how to design the steering wheel.

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Paul

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Message 3 of 7

07-02-2011 11:04 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Thanks a lot Mike that is exactly what we were looking for and it is very simple.

Upon looking at this there is one more thing that we'd like to be able to do with this concept but we can't see how this can be done.

We would like to be able to place a Datum and insert the component as you have prescribed on the new Datum. This works great as long as the orientation is the same as the original XYZ Datum but we found that we could not insert a component to a tilted Datum. Is there a way that this can be done?

The model that is created would be oriented as if it was true to the XYZ datum that it is created on, but this XYZ datum would be tilted and in a different location than the original XYZ datum.

We looked at ways of insertion but did not see the option to insert on a tilted Datum.

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Dave

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Registered: 2011-11-23

Message 4 of 7

07-02-2011 11:44 . am   |   View his/her posts only
Why not do a top down design? That way all features of each part will be related to the mating features of the other parts mated to it. If you accept the definition that for a feature to be a datum it must mate with another part, your valid datum structure is automatically created each time you add a part to the assembly.

After some initial complaining to Mike when I first started with VX, I have found top down design to be easy to do resulting in parts that assemble correctly when manufactured.

While I don't put drawings in the same file because it can be come very large, I find that all my projects just have two files, one for models, one for drawing sheets.


Daved

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Mike

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Registered: 2002-8-28

Message 5 of 7

07-02-2011 12:35 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
Paul,

If you are doing Bottom-Up assembly design, you can "Align" your parts to any existing face or datum in the assembly as well as adding an angle between coincident faces/datums. By default, the only datums that are visible are the three in your assembly, but if would help, you can turn on the local datums for all your components. See View > External Datums.

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Paul

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Registered: 2011-7-12

Message 6 of 7

07-02-2011 01:49 . pm   |   View his/her posts only
We found something which I think answers the insertion on a twisted datum which is built in the Assembly. We discovered that the Frame function would allow our new component to be snapped to this position. This does address the capabilities which we were hoping to see.

I am not sure whether we would be designing Top to Down or Down to Top. Most likely the Assembly would revolve around a starting component of which everything would be built off of. We would prefer this to be created in a true position. (This is why sometimes we would want to build off of an existing datum because some times parts are best built in a different orientation.)

I appreciate everyone's help. I anticipate this will help us to be much more efficient.

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William

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Registered: 2010-10-28

Message 7 of 7

09-02-2011 03:37 . am   |   View his/her posts only
ZW3D permits you to create an assembly using two different approaches: top down assembly and bottom up assembly.

What is the Top Down 3D CAD Assembly Approach?

In short, in the top down approach you have to create the blank assembly first and then you have to go on creating the sub-assemblies and parts in it. So, if the main assembly is at the top most level and the components are in bottom most level, then you are coming from top to bottom and it's top down assembly.

The Attach files is a technical article : How to make top down design by ZW3D

I hope that it can help you to know more about ZW3D
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